Single Sisters Speak Out

The Modern Life of the Single Sister

Where are we? June 10, 2009

Filed under: Single Sisters On... — peyso @ 10:29 pm

Read this first ——> http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2009/03/17/immigrant

 

Today has been a very hectic day for me. I was out on Monday because I took the LSAT. (I think did decent on them, but we’ll see in 3 weeks). The short week hurt my schedule. So I’m trying to squeeze in that missed day of work and the fact that I had to attend two conferences this week didn’t help. However, in the midst of this I got to read Cuzzo’s entry about carnival, in its various forms around the world. I always remembered attending these events, even though me and my friends arent caribbean. Then I thought about that group of friends that I used to attend the Labor Day festivities, and I realized that out of a group of 15 dudes, only four of us should be considered even relatively successful by normal standards. It got me to thinking, am I endangered species? Not because I am an Ivy League educated, Que, with decent credit, from the projects and no criminal record. I know, I’m the shit. Just playing but not really. But because I am all of what I mentioned and black. Yea, I said it. But before this turns into a convo about good black men being endangered, let me give you a bit more clarity. What I mean is that I am a black American and I am a male. Maybe this is an up north black thing, but where are all the, as my friends would call us, regular black folk? I feel like that now that I am not in the projects anymore and I dont normally associate with people who live their on the regular, everyone I meet is Nigerian or their parents are from the islands. Where are all the people from the projects? Do us regular black folk just never leave the hood? This isn’t a post hating on people whose parents immigrated to this country, I just wanna know what happened to all the descendants of American slaves. I just don’t understand, some of us have to be successful.  Can someone help me out with this one? Why do you think this phenomenon exists? On a side note, and some of our non black readers can help me with this, but in general do white people see the differences in people of the African diaspora?

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25 Responses to “Where are we?”

  1. Peyso, I think you live in a more diverse area than me. Where I’m at, and further down south, we are all up and through and heavily populated. I don’t know anyone personally (besides the blogs) that is West African, etc.

    I would love to have the chance to know people from more backgrounds and soak up their culture.

  2. Shawnta` Says:

    Morning, y’all.

    @Peyso: Congrats on completing your LSAT prep & taking the LSAT. I’m sure you did just fine…better than fine actually. You’ll see in a few short weeks.

    I’ll be back to give my opinion on this topic shortly.

  3. thecomebackgirl Says:

    I don’t have time to read the article yet..but i remember about 7 or 8 years ago the New Yorker did a whole issue dedicated to immigration. One section really explored the “model minority” within the black community which consisted of Caribbeans and Africans. Its a fascinating relationship white folks set up with other blacks in the diaspora and how at times they play us against each other vying for the the “model” identifier..fascinating stuff.

  4. Holly GoLightly Says:

    Great post Peyso! Being in Atlanta you are exposed to a lot of different cultures and there is a large Caribbean culture that exists here as well…

    I read the article… still thinking on it.

    I do however agree with Comeback on “ts a fascinating relationship white folks set up with other blacks in the diaspora and how at times they play us against each other vying for the the “model” identifier..fascinating stuff.”

  5. Oh and congratulations Peyso!

  6. J Money Says:

    There is a lot of common black folk in the south…A LOT!!!

  7. peyso Says:

    I figured all the black folk had to be in the south but that doesnt speak to why I’m not meeting any in the circles I run in.

  8. Commander Bond aka Humble One Says:

    Peyso I have noticed the same thing. Maybe it’s a northern thing. I don’t meet too many people from the hood that are professionals. This may be just my personal experience but it seems like blacks in the south seem to attend college more than in the north.

  9. @Peyso: sometimes when black folks get a little education, they no longer want to hang their own- who knows the exact reason, could be that way for fear of competition or because they can no longer deal with the regulars. I had a black woman manager once and she showed me this.. perhaps this is why you don’t see them- they don’t want to be seen.

  10. peyso Says:

    @ Nicki – I’m not talking about meeting professionals in the hood, IMHO, I feel like I shouldnt be meeting them there unless they are there for the same reasons that I am; to visit fam, to give back and to show ppl they can do it too. I’m talking about when I’m with the bougie black folk, at the happy hours and at the colleges and frat meetings and Greek Picnics, where are the black folk?

  11. @peyso: I don’t mean the black folks in the hood. LOL .I was talking about on the job, and all that stuff you are talking about. I’m saying sometimes they don’t want to be hanging with their own people in those events. Some of the boughie black folks wanna hang with the 2520s or those that are more culturally diverse.

    Additionally, maybe yaw have too many choices of stuff to do. Here, if there is a professional black party thrown, we are ALL going because there’s not a lot of stuff for us to do.

  12. J Money Says:

    I think the black people you are refering to Peyso cannot handle the big city atmosphere. I think it is more so they feel that they do not belong in that atmosphere. Regular common black folk do not wanna hangout with bougie black people. It is a sad reality because they may have come from the same background but it is them judging before they know. Someone may have even suggested hanging at some your spots to these people. But they probably dismissed it because they think all college educated black folk think so high of themselves and would look down on them.

    Then analyze the environment, we generally like slow and easy paced cities and environments. It is hard to transition from the south and move up north. Climate, people attitudes, and pace of the city. I think you have to either be raised up north or conditioned mentally for it to live there.

  13. I wouldn’t want to live up north.

  14. peyso Says:

    @ Nicki – We dont want you either lol

  15. thecomebackgirl Says:

    I think the black people you are refering to Peyso cannot handle the big city atmosphere. I think it is more so they feel that they do not belong in that atmosphere. Regular common black folk do not wanna hangout with bougie black people. It is a sad reality because they may have come from the same background but it is them judging before they know. Someone may have even suggested hanging at some your spots to these people. But they probably dismissed it because they think all college educated ”

    This is a fascinating comment in and of itself. I don’t know I am really really intrigued by migration patterns of black folks. The shift north and west, as the industrial boom occured and even now, how many black folks are fleeing or migrating away from urban centers. Part of it I think is a function of an ability to create and maintain a decent living back in the south. I am a bright lights big city girl…who has big dreams of living on a farm ..at least for 3 months out of the year.

    Black Immigrants ideally flock to urban centers where there are usually OTHER like immigrants and better historically better opportunities and a relative amount of tolerance and respect-at least in their little protective communities “Little Haiti”, Little Trinidad, Little Nigera…etc. etc.

    I really liked this post. I wish I had more time to read the dayum article.

  16. thecomebackgirl Says:

    sorry meant “Little Nigeria.”

  17. Yeah yaw do, Peyso. lol

    Nah, seriously, I think southern people are more easy going then up North. Seems like u guys are pretty fast paced.

  18. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t want to be in the durty durty Souf either… I’m more of an in between girl.

  19. J Money Says:

    @CBG – I think the thing with immigrants, is they are seeking out opportunities and those opportunities are in the high industry areas. Which most are up north NY, Chi, Philly, Cinn etc. You really don’t have the same opportuniites in Ala, Miss, Nola. Atlanta would probably be to me the most high industry city in the south. Then the money is there even if you are not interested in industry. You could start a hotdog stand chain, or own you a corner stores in NY or Chi and get paid. You can’t do that really in the south. The traffic flow and population is not as strong.

  20. thecomebackgirl Says:

    “Which most are up north NY, Chi, Philly, Cinn etc”

    I agree only slightly. I think black immigrants have larger support networks in the urban areas ….because of the opportunities…wash/rinse/repeat. The New Yorker article I referenced above stated that many times black immigrants start off in jobs that black Americans don’t want.

    “You could start a hotdog stand chain, or own you a corner stores in NY or Chi and get paid. You can’t do that really in the south. The traffic flow and population is not as strong.”

    Umm..not sure about this, not given today. I think it has to do with the jobs that are able to quickly help sustain the black immigrant that causes them not to really work outside of their social network. In my opinion there is a huge shift back to agriculture, green technology, etc…alot of big stuff is happening on farms and in rural America (by way of alternative fuel and the like). But since the USDA has robbed most black Americans of their farm land…Im sure black Immigrants arent going flocking there. My case is that its not for the lack of opportunity or money, but the job sectors that traditionally have gotten black immigrants on their feet quickly, within sectors where they’ve had support of their own (healthcare, incl. nursing etc) etc. etc.

  21. Lovely Paradox Says:

    Very interesting article. As a black immigrant, I wouldn’t even be qualified to answer the question, but from my observations, if nowhere else I think the demographics you are referring to can be found online. The black population in the US is relatively small to begin with, factor in the different parameters you mentionned and you have an even smaller population. This population will be spread out across all geographical areas… Conclusion you only encounter a small number of people in that specific demographic.

    I have a question: Would you include black people who did grow up in Middle Class families (suburbs, etc…) in that demographic? If you do, then a big chunk of my friends will fit in. And I live in the South, so you might be onto something with this North vs. South thing.

    @JAtlanta would probably be to me the most high industry city in the south.

    Houston will rank higher than Atlanta in this regard. Unless we don’t consider Texas part of the south.

  22. Cuzzo Says:

    finally broke away from the grips of FB to comment. Wow, I’m an immigrant black…go fig. I really don’t know what to say since I’m not (or at least don’t consider myself) a regular black. I think in any case, when you work for opportunities, you appreciate them more. Immigrant blacks made their way to this country to work hard because they appreciate the opportunity to live in this country. And, I don’t know how to say that any other way without sounding like american blacks don’t appreciate it….cause that’s not where I’m going with the statement.

    I think white folks see us as one race just the way we see them. I’m pretty sure WASP’s see themselves differently from Irish, Italian, Greeks, etc. Yet a white dude is just a white dude to me whether their name is Berkowitz or Bush.

  23. thecomebackgirl Says:

    “, I’m an immigrant black…go fig”

    @ Cuzzo..the interesting thing is I think MOST “black Americans” are if they shake the family tree a little bit. My maternal grandfather’s peeps immigrated from Haiti.

    My French is bad as he!l but I do love rice LOL…(ignant comment of the day) AND…i think that my mother’s side of the family had a work ethic unmmatched. However my father’s people were WAY more financially successful..and my father’s brothers and sisters in my opinion were lazy as hell. They were seperated by strategic thinking as oppossed to hands to the grindstone.

  24. Satya Says:

    Good post Peyso. I’ve been asking the same question. I am a “regular american black person” from the bricks up north who completed high school and college w\o having kids etc… and can’t seem to find any other american black folks in my circles, and I still live in the north. My closest friends have roots in the carribbean and India. I think american black folks need a networking event up north so we can meet and greet and go back to our hoods and help folks out

  25. streetz Says:

    Im from NYC. THeMelting Pot. Nuff sd. lmao


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